NEWS HEADLINES

  • U.S. deploys more troops to Middle East, blames Iran for tanker attacks

    U.S. deploys more troops to Middle East, blames Iran for tanker attacksPresident Donald Trump's administration also invoked the threat from Iran to declare a national security-related emergency that would clear the sale of billions of dollars' worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and other countries without required congressional approval. The actions were the latest by the Trump administration as it highlights what it sees as a threat of potential attack by Iran, and follows decisions to speed the deployment of an aircraft carrier strike group as well as send bombers and additional Patriot missiles to the Middle East. The deployments, decried by Iran as escalatory, have come amid a freeze in direct communication between the United States and Iran that has raised concerns about the increasing risk of an inadvertent conflict.


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  • The Latest: Jayme Closs' family satisfied with sentence

    The Latest: Jayme Closs' family satisfied with sentenceBARRON, Wis. (AP) — The latest on the sentencing hearing for a Wisconsin man accused of kidnapping 13-year-old Jayme Closs and killing her parents (all times local):


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ONTOGENY AND PHYLOGENY

STEPHEN JAY GOLD

BIOGRAPHY

Stephen Jay Gould was born and raised in the community of Bayside, a neighborhood of the northeastern section of Queens in New York City. His father Leonard was a court stenographer, and his mother Eleanor was an artist whose parents were Jewish immigrants living and working in the city's Garment District.[6] When Gould was five years old his father took him to the Hall of Dinosaurs in the American Museum of Natural History, where he first encountered Tyrannosaurus rex. "I had no idea there were such things—I was awestruck," Gould once recalled.[7] It was in that moment that he decided to become a paleontologist.


Raised in a secular Jewish home, Gould did not formally practice religion and preferred to be called an agnostic. Biologist Jerry Coyne, who had Gould on his thesis committee, described him as a "diehard atheist if there ever was one.

stephen