stephen jay gould

(september 10, 1941-may 20,2002)
  • Rep. Swalwell: Trump 'makes us look like geniuses every day for impeaching him'

    Rep. Swalwell: Trump 'makes us look like geniuses every day for impeaching him'Rep. Eric Swalwell to the Yahoo News "Skullduggery" podcast: Recent disclosures that the White House failed to act on intelligence showing that Russian operatives were paying bounties to kill American soldiers fully vindicates impeachment.


    read more

  • Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan

    Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in ManhattanThe New York Post obtained photos showing Cohen, Trump's former lawyer, eating out with his wife and another couple in Manhattan Thursday night.


    read more

  • Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists

    Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalistsAs protests originally sparked by the death of George Floyd continue in Portland, Oregon, a US District Court has issued a two-week restraining order barring the Portland Police Bureau from arresting journalists and legal observers or using force against them.The order comes after the police arrested journalists who were covering a protest on Tuesday. One of them, Lesley McLam, was taken into custody.


    read more

  • Army IDs Fort Hood soldier who killed himself after being questioned about Vanessa Guillen

    Army IDs Fort Hood soldier who killed himself after being questioned about Vanessa GuillenSpc. Aaron David Robinson ran away from Fort Hood after officials said they found partial human remains near the Leon River, authorities said.


    read more

  • Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message

    Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July messageBiden's video message came hours after President Trump accused protesters who have pushed for racial justice of engaging in a "merciless campaign to wipe out our history."


    read more

  • Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War

    Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a WarFighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. What that means is that “sensor to shooter” time (how fast data can go from a sensor to a war-fighter) needs to be drastically sped up. Without that speed, warfighters won’t be able to react as quickly to threats and it will be harder to win.


    read more

  • The world should stand up to China over Hong Kong, activist Nathan Law says

    The world should stand up to China over Hong Kong, activist Nathan Law saysHong Kong's fate shows China's true authoritarianism so the rest of the world should stand up to President Xi Jinping and start to put human rights above financial gain, pro-democracy activist Nathan Law told Reuters. China unveiled a national security law this week which Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters and the West say breaches the "one country, two systems" principle enshrined in the 1984 Sino-British treaty that guaranteed the autonomy of Hong Kong. "The protests in Hong Kong have been a window for the world to recognise that China is getting more and more authoritarian," Law told Reuters via internet video.


    read more

  • How not to do Covid: Kazakhstan first country in the world to fully return to lockdown

    How not to do Covid: Kazakhstan first country in the world to fully return to lockdownKazakhstan will on Sunday become the first nation in the world to re-impose a country-wide lockdown after its easing in mid-May of largely successful measures to counter coronavirus sparked a surge in infections. The central Asian country, which borders Russia in the north-west and China in the east, appeared to have contained the disease after a two-month lockdown with just a few thousand confirmed Covid-19 cases. But Kazakhstan, home to 18 million, embraced its re-discovered freedoms with gusto. Family-oriented Kazakhs went back and forth to see relatives, and police would routinely bust wedding parties of up to 100 people as large gatherings were still banned. Cafes and gyms were busy again, and borders were opened to ease travel. Now it is faced with a total of 44,000 confirmed cases. Its hospitals - unlike previously - are over-stretched. Kazakhstan is a cautionary tale for all others exiting lockdown. Travel will be limited again, working hours of public transport cut down, non-essential businesses closed, and two cities in Kazakhstan’s east will be closed. Social media has been flooded with images of ambulances lining up outside hospitals. Kazakhs got so spooked about the growing outbreak that lines have formed at pharmacies this week as people started hoarding medicine, triggering shortages. On Thursday, 70,000 packets of paracetamol delivered to pharmacies in Almaty, the country's biggest city sold out within half an hour. Saule Atygayeva, chief infectious disease doctor in the capital city of Nur-Sultan, held back tears as she told the Khabar TV channel: “I have been working for 28 years, and I have never seen anything like this before. A lot of people are dying just because people don’t care about anything. They’re out on streets, going to parties, infecting each other.” Lukpan Akhmedyarov, a newspaper editor in the town of Uralsk by the Russian border, told The Sunday Telegraph: "Most people simply did not believe there was any danger. The message from authorities was that we have passed the peak. But we can see now that we’re just getting close to it. “The number of cases we had back in March was dozens. Now we’re recording hundreds of new cases every day, doctors have no energy any longer, and people have no money.” Although the official death tolls stands at just 200, it is believed the true figure is much higher. But it is still a fraction of those suffered in many countries, including the UK, where 44,000 have died. During the spring lockdown, authorities sealed off neighbourhoods for days, locked up blocks of flats where a Covid-19 case was confirmed, and put up checkpoints. But there was a backlash when people emerged from the quarantine. Kundiz Ospan, 37, a lawyer from Almaty, and her family followed lockdown restrictions but several days after her husband, also a lawyer, went back to his office in mid-May, the family got ill. “What we’re going through right now is what Italy had in March." she said. Ms Ospan said some of her gym friends ridiculed her for missing work-out sessions at the end of the lockdown. “People thought that it was some non-existing disease because they didn’t know anyone who had it,” she said. When she posted on Facebook that she was down with coronavirus, she started receiving hate messages. “Now every family has someone who’s been ill,” she said.


    read more

  • Epstein confidant Ghislaine Maxwell will reportedly give names

    Epstein confidant Ghislaine Maxwell will reportedly give namesGhislaine Maxwell faces decades behind bars following her arrest by the FBI; reaction from Fox News contributor Tammy Bruce and Fox News legal analyst Gregg Jarrett.


    read more

  • House judiciary panel to interview ousted NY prosecutor

    House judiciary panel to interview ousted NY prosecutorThe ousted former U.S. attorney for Manhattan will sit down with the House Judiciary Committee next week for a closed-door interview as the panel investigates politicization in the Justice Department. Geoffrey Berman, the former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York who led investigations into allies of President Donald Trump, will appear in person for the transcribed interview July 9, according to a person familiar with the meeting who requested anonymity because it hasn't yet been announced. Berman left his job last month after an extraordinary standoff in which he refused to resign until Trump himself fired him.


    read more

  • 5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates

    5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection ratesOfficials on the island of Sardinia expressed frustration at having to exclude the US travellers after their long flight, said reports.


    read more

  • Gunmen kill 26 people in deadly attack on drug rehabilitation centre in Mexico

    Gunmen kill 26 people in deadly attack on drug rehabilitation centre in MexicoGunmen have killed 26 people in a deadly attack on a drug rehabilitation centre in central Mexico as the country’s government struggles to fulfil its pledge to stop gang violence.Police in Guanajuato state said the attack on Wednesday occurred at a modest two-story house, which was an unregistered rehab centre on the outskirts of the town of Irapuato.


    read more

  • U.S. sends carriers to South China Sea during Chinese military drills

    U.S. sends carriers to South China Sea during Chinese military drillsBoth countries have accused each other of stoking tensions in the strategic waterway, at a time of strained relations.


    read more

  • India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members

    India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang membersGang members fired at the officers during a raid in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.


    read more

  • It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses

    It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea CollapsesThe prospect of a peaceful Korean Unification, however remote it seems, would be a historical event worth planning for. While preparing for the worst, we should hope for the best. Hoping for the best means there is a scenario where North Korea’s collapse and regime change occur miraculously, opening doors to South Korea and the West to take over North Korea in what one hopes would be a peaceful absorption. As unlikely as this sounds, it is important to remember that it is not without historical precedent.


    read more

  • Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'

    Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'Denmark woke up on Friday to the words "racist fish" scrawled across the base of the "Little Mermaid", the bronze statue honouring Hans Christian Andersen's famous fairy tale that perches on a rock in the sea off a pier in Copenhagen. "We consider it vandalism and have started an investigation," a spokesman for the Copenhagen police said. Protesters of the Black Lives Matter movement around the world have in recent months rallied against statues of historical figures who played a role in racist oppression, such as slave traders and colonialists.


    read more

  • Lincoln deserves statues but the Emancipation Memorial misleads on him and Black history

    Lincoln deserves statues but the Emancipation Memorial misleads on him and Black historyLincoln would have bristled at the statue and the 'Great Emancipator' honorific. He was a reluctant emancipator whose assassination made him a martyr.


    read more

  • Texas Gov. Moves to Stop COVID-19 but It’s Already Out of Control

    Texas Gov. Moves to Stop COVID-19 but It’s Already Out of ControlDemocratic officials angry at Texas Gov. Greg Abbott’s handling of surging coronavirus numbers in the state this week had one lackluster place to voice their frustrations about the rapidly escalating public health crisis killing their constituents: a Zoom press conference.“While some states followed the advice of public health experts, Texas did not,” Dallas-area State Rep. Toni Rose said from a webcam on Wednesday, a photograph of the Texas Capitol superimposed behind her. It was certainly not the first time Democrats in the state had inveighed against a pandemic approach criticized by some as too reckless, and followed months of power struggles between local and state leaders in Texas over lockdowns, masks, and more.But the politics of the COVID-19 situation in the state—Democrats yelling into the void, at least until Gov. Greg Abbott ordered mask use in hot zones across the state Thursday—had already given way to hard numbers, not just of cases, but also of hospitalizations, with the state’s medical system suddenly under pressure that seemed unthinkable even a few weeks ago.“If rates [of infection] continue to increase 50 percent week over week, you can only do that for so long,” said Dr. David Lakey, vice chancellor for health affairs and chief medical officer at the University of Texas system and a member of the Texas Medical Association COVID-19 Task Force.He added that chief medical officers across the state, at least this week, are “really busy, but they’re managing it.” The fear, he explained, is what next week, or the week after, will look like. And while beds, ventilators, and ICU rooms are holding up overall so far, “they’re starting to see some challenges in staff,” like respiratory therapists and nurses. As those challenges rise with the climbing hospitalizations, staffers have gotten sick or been forced to quarantine after exposures. And the numbers are getting more ominous. Texas broke another record for daily new cases on Tuesday, at 8,076 infections, according to state data. The previous record, on Monday, was 6,975. Days earlier, the record was 5,996. On June 16, the state broke the 4,000-mark for the first time.As Democratic State Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer, who represents San Antonio, said during the press conference, Gov. Greg Abbott “gambled” with Texas lives with an aggressive reopening, and “we have lost.”After a slew of mayors and judges tried to drag their feet on the governor’s swift reopening plan earlier this spring, the state’s attorney general sent letters to leaders in Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio warning that rules stricter than the state’s might be met with legal action. As the surges worsened across the state, though, Abbott gave his tacit consent for local officials to impose masking requirements on businesses, and urged individual Texans to mask up. ‘If People Die, People Die’: Texas COVID Hot Spots Keep Getting WorseThis week, Abbott went much further, shutting down bars statewide and suspending elective medical procedures in eight counties. Bar owners who previously said they supported Abbott’s reopening turned against the governor, with some protesting in front of the state Capitol holding signs that read “Bar Lives Matter.” And on Thursday, Abbott made a remarkable turnaround, ordering residents to wear face masks in all counties with at least 20 COVID-19 cases, and empowering local authorities to break up gatherings of more than 10 people.But conversations with health experts and medical professionals in the state suggested the emerging crisis at medical facilities in Texas was already deeply advanced.Texas Medical Center, the world’s largest medical complex, indicated last Thursday that its base intensive care capacity hit 100 percent and that it was “on pace to exceed an ‘unsustainable surge capacity’ of intensive care beds by July 6,” The Houston Chronicle reported this week. Last week, the Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston began admitting adult patients because of the surge, according to the paper. Internal communications at Houston hospitals revealed a lack of space and therapeutic drugs as the region’s medical facilities worked to treat more than 3,000 COVID-19 patients, including about 800 in intensive care, NBC News and Propublica reported Wednesday.Meanwhile, as of Tuesday, about 75 percent of Tarrant County’s intensive care unit beds were occupied, The Fort Worth Star-Telegram first reported.At recent hospitalization growth rates, facilities in Tarrant and Dallas counties could reach their surge capacities in as few as four weeks, according to Rajesh Nandy, an associate professor of biostatistics and epidemiology in the University of North Texas’s School of Public Health.“The simplest way to look at is this: Let’s say the trend doesn’t change, and hospital capacity stays the same as it is currently. Under those assumptions, it would be two to three weeks before they’re operating at max capacity,” Nandy, whose team has studied local and national COVID-19 data since the pandemic began, told The Daily Beast on Wednesday. “It probably would be three to four weeks when we’d be overloaded even with surge capacities. At that point, we’d have to consider creating new facilities at convention centers.”Despite those warnings, Dallas-area hospitals have repeatedly said they don’t need to prepare a pop-up facility at a nearby convention center, with the chair of the Texas Medical Associations’ board of trustees telling the newspaper that there are “a number of safety valves that could be pushed.”Still, said Nandy: “Our health-care system will be overwhelmed if it continues like this.”And ragged, frustrated medical providers all over the state have said they’re anxious about the days to come.“We are in an entirely different place now than what we were just four weeks ago,” said Dr. Pritesh Gandhi, an Austin-based primary care doctor and the associate chief medical officer at People’s Community Clinic, which serves uninsured and underinsured Central Texans. “In the last few days, our clinic has seen three or four times as many patients for drive-through testing than we had weeks ago, and it’s reflective of massive community spread.” Gandhi, a Democratic candidate for Texas’ 10th Congressional District, called the medical community’s efforts to provide care for Texans during the past month of surges “extraordinarily challenging” and said it has been “complicated by failures at both the federal and state level.”“We’re testing more, having more positives, having more symptomatic patients, doing more drive-through testing,” Gandhi told The Daily Beast on Wednesday. “Staff are getting sick, just like anywhere else.”Gandhi, and the group of Democratic state representatives who held the press conference, decried an undercurrent of “science denialism” and “hostility towards public health” perhaps best embodied by an interview Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick gave to Fox News hours earlier. He said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious disease expert in the country—and the face of the federal response to the pandemic—was “wrong every time on every issue.”“He doesn’t know what he’s talking about!” Patrick told Fox News on Tuesday evening. “I don’t need his advice anymore.”Dr. Lakey—a former commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services who was appointed by former Texas Gov. Rick Perry—was more forgiving of Abbott than others in the state. He said he doesn’t envy those, like the governor, who’ve had to navigate the middle ground between complete statewide shutdowns and complete light-switch openings.“It’s a very fraught time in public health,” said Lakey. “No one has a crystal ball. There’s no perfect plan.”“You make your plan, and then you have to be ready to adjust your plan,” said Lakey. “That’s not a sign of failure, it’s a sign that you’re looking at the data and trying to make the best decision.”But both Rose and Rep. Donna Howard, who represents Austin, said their constituents would likely benefit from a second statewide shutdown, and that Abbott’s decisions had been deeply damaging. Martinez-Fischer emphasized that stay-at-home orders were a tool that should never have been taken out of local hands.“We know that it worked before,” said Howard. “That contained the spread before. We have to do what we have to do here, and unfortunately shutting down may be our only option.”Whether or not that’s true, it remains unclear if Abbott would do it, as he’s said “closing down Texas again will always be the last option.” Then again, many public health experts question whether it would be necessary.As Lakey noted: It’s no longer March. Those trying to battle the crisis in Texas have the benefit of months of nationwide observation, studies about intubation, clinical trials, and promising therapeutic treatments like Remdesivir. And the mask order could help turn the tide.“We have learned from that experience and are bringing those lessons to the response,” said Lakey. Still, he and others point to the myriad unknowns in the coming days, from July 4 weekend celebrations to college students possibly returning to campuses in just a few weeks.As Gandhi said on Wednesday, “We’re angry and we’re exhausted because of the incompetence.” “It didn’t have to be like this.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


    read more

  • The Latest: Trump to establish 'National Garden' of heroes

    The Latest: Trump to establish 'National Garden' of heroesPresident Donald Trump says he will establish a “National Garden of American Heroes,” which he is describing as “a vast outdoor park that will feature the statues of the greatest Americans who ever lived.” Trump made the announcement as he opened the Fourth of July weekend with a speech and fireworks at the iconic Mount Rushmore. The executive order released Friday by the White House says the garden will feature statues of several presidents as well as other historic notables, including Davy Crockett, Amelia Earhart, Billy Graham, Harriet Tubman and Orville and Wilbur Wright.


    read more

  • A massive economic crisis and the coronavirus pandemic are pushing Lebanon towards a famine

    A massive economic crisis and the coronavirus pandemic are pushing Lebanon towards a famineThere are estimates from the World Bank that 75% of the country's population could end up living in poverty, France24 reported.


    read more

  • Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video

    Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral videoVisitors to a beach last week would have seen a shark-like fish soaring above their heads thanks to one bird’s actions.A video shared online showed one huge predatory bird seen with what appeared to be a shark suspended in its claws above crowds at South Carolina’s Myrtle Beach.


    read more

  • Crusading ex-cop's arrest sparks police pushback in Russia

    Crusading ex-cop's arrest sparks police pushback in RussiaWhen police moved in to arrest Vladimir Vorontsov in May, they didn't bother to knock. Instead, two commando teams stormed the former policeman's top-floor apartment in southeast Moscow at around 7:00 am, one abseiling down the high-rise while the other broke down the door. "Our daughter thinks that bandits came and took daddy away," Aleksandra Vorontsova told AFP, describing the swoop on her husband, an activist for police labour rights.


    read more

  • Sikh pilgrims in deadly Pakistan train crash

    Sikh pilgrims in deadly Pakistan train crashAt least 21 die as an express train hits a van carrying the pilgrims near the city of Lahore.


    read more

  • Iran's Military Is Armed to the Teeth with Lots of Missiles

    Iran's Military Is Armed to the Teeth with Lots of MissilesAnd it has built the region's largest missile force.


    read more

  • China rebukes Canada over criticism of Hong Kong security law

    China rebukes Canada over criticism of Hong Kong security lawChina fired back at Canada on Saturday for criticising Beijing's national security law for Hong Kong, the second rebuke in a week that has added to strains of their bilateral ties. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Friday that Canada was suspending its extradition treaty with Hong Kong due to the law and Canada's foreign minister called the legislation "a significant step back" for liberty. China's embassy in Ottawa said in a statement on its website that Canada had "grossly interfered" in Chinese affairs, adding that the new legislation would safeguard security in Hong Kong.


    read more

  • A Black woman questioned her hotel bill — and an employee called police, NC suit says

    A Black woman questioned her hotel bill — and an employee called police, NC suit saysThe suit comes days after a video showed a worker at another hotel in North Carolina call police on Black guests at the hotel pool.


    read more

  • American pride falls to record low, poll shows

    American pride falls to record low, poll showsAmerican patriotism has fallen to its lowest point in nearly 20 years.


    read more

  • Prosecutors say the timing of charges against Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell is 'not at all' related to Trump firing Geoffrey Berman

    Prosecutors say the timing of charges against Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell is 'not at all' related to Trump firing Geoffrey BermanPresident Donald Trump fired US Attorney Geoffrey Berman last month. His replacement said Maxwell's the timing of arrest isn't related.


    read more

  • Virus spike in Spain reveals plight of seasonal farm workers

    Virus spike in Spain reveals plight of seasonal farm workersIn the 20 years since he left his native Senegal, Biram Fall has never slept in the streets. This week, when he ran out of savings after failing to find work in northern Spain’s peach orchards, he still refused to do so. As part of an army of cheap labor that follows the ripening of different crops across the country, the 52-year-old responded in May to an urgent call for workers in Lleida, a major gateway to surrounding fertile farmland.


    read more

  • Coronavirus outbreak among students at University of Washington's frat houses

    Coronavirus outbreak among students at University of Washington's frat housesThe school said Friday that it confirmed that at least 89 fraternity house residents, along with four other students, have tested positive for COVID-19.


    read more

  • A Facebook recruiter filed a federal complaint alleging the company is biased against Black employees and job candidates

    A Facebook recruiter filed a federal complaint alleging the company is biased against Black employees and job candidatesA recruiter and two rejected job applicants, all Black, accused Facebook of bias in evaluating, promoting, paying and hiring Black workers.


    read more

  • Carlos Ghosn: Japan ask US to extradite ex-Green Beret and son over Japan escape

    Carlos Ghosn: Japan ask US to extradite ex-Green Beret and son over Japan escapeThe ex-soldier and his son are held in the US for allegedly helping the ex-Nissan boss flee Japan.


    read more

  • Russia Has a Nuclear Missile That Can Kill Nearly Anything on the Planet

    Russia Has a Nuclear Missile That Can Kill Nearly Anything on the PlanetHow? Think range.


    read more

  • Gov. Huckabee on Trump’s re-election strategy: President will face some challenges

    Gov. Huckabee on Trump’s re-election strategy: President will face some challenges Former Arkansas governor and Fox News contributor Mike Huckabee says Trump has ‘enough time to remind people the worst thing they can do is vote for Biden’ on ‘America’s Newsroom.’


    read more

  • Iran threatens retaliation after what it calls possible cyber attack on nuclear site

    Iran threatens retaliation after what it calls possible cyber attack on nuclear siteIran will retaliate against any country that carries out cyber attacks on its nuclear sites, the head of civilian defence said, after a fire at its Natanz plant which some Iranian officials said may have been caused by cyber sabotage. The Natanz uranium-enrichment site, much of which is underground, is one of several Iranian facilities monitored by inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the U.N. nuclear watchdog. Iran's top security body said on Friday the cause of the "incident" at the nuclear site had been determined, but "due to security considerations" it would be announced at a convenient time.


    read more

  • ‘Not ashamed of our history.’ Spanish towns offer to take colonizer statues from US

    ‘Not ashamed of our history.’ Spanish towns offer to take colonizer statues from USCalifornia lawmakers described the statues in the state capitol as “completely out of place today.”


    read more

  • Suspect Named, New Details Released in Case of Missing Soldier Vanessa Guillen

    Suspect Named, New Details Released in Case of Missing Soldier Vanessa GuillenArmy officials said there is no evidence that a soldier who killed himself to avoid capture sexually assaulted Guillen.


    read more

  • The surgeon general refused to give a yes or no answer when asked if he would advise people to attend large gatherings for the 4th of July

    The surgeon general refused to give a yes or no answer when asked if he would advise people to attend large gatherings for the 4th of JulyDuring an appearance on the "Today" show, US Surgeon General Jerome Adams didn't advise people not to attend large gatherings for the 4th of July.


    read more

  • Boeing communications chief resigns over article from 30 years ago

    Boeing communications chief resigns over article from 30 years agoBoeing's communications chief resigned Thursday following a complaint over an article he wrote more than 30 years ago contending that women should not serve in combat. Niel Golightly leaves his post at Boeing after just months on the job. In a press statement, he said that the article "was a 29-year-old Cold War navy pilot's misguided contribution to a debate that was live at the time."


    read more

  • White Mich. couple charged after gun pulled on Black family

    White Mich. couple charged after gun pulled on Black familyA white couple face criminal charges after one of them was captured on video pulling a handgun on a Black woman and her daughters in a restaurant parking lot in Michigan. Jillian Wuestenberg, 32, and Eric Wuestenberg, 42, were arrested after Wednesday night's confrontation and charged Thursday with felonious assault, Oakland County Prosecutor Jessica Cooper said in a release. As a condition of the bond they must turn over all firearms, not engage in “assaultive behavior” and not leave Michigan, Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a statement.


    read more

  • CNN reporter mugged at knifepoint live on air in Brazil

    CNN reporter mugged at knifepoint live on air in BrazilA CNN journalist was mugged at knifepoint during a live broadcast in Brazil.Bruna Macedo and her team had set up near the Bandeiras Bridge in Sao Paulo on Saturday to report on rising water levels in the Tete River due to heavy rain.


    read more

  • Did Russia Give Us a Sneak Peak of Its New Nuclear Hunter-Killer Attack Submarine?

    Did Russia Give Us a Sneak Peak of Its New Nuclear Hunter-Killer Attack Submarine?Russia has one of the largest submarine fleets in the world, but it is aging.


    read more

  • School districts pushed to reopen say there isn't enough money to do it safely

    School districts pushed to reopen say there isn't enough money to do it safely"They're caught between a rock and a hard place, and the biggest fear is they're going to be forced to open schools without the safety guidelines."


    read more

  • Have Americans Warmed to Calls to 'Defund the Police'?

    Have Americans Warmed to Calls to 'Defund the Police'?Just over a month ago, the term "defund the police" was almost entirely the domain of activists and academics. Now it's a household phrase, with a huge majority of Americans telling pollsters they recognize it.But what exactly does it mean? And when Americans hear it, what do they think of? For proponents of police reform, is it a useful slogan -- or dangerously alienating?In the immediate aftermath of George Floyd's killing in late May at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, calls to sharply cut police funding appeared potentially radioactive. Beyond some high-profile progressive figures, including a number of young politicians of color, few leading Democrats embraced the term.Joe Biden, the party's presumptive presidential nominee, staked out his position early last month: "I do not support defunding police," he wrote in a USA Today op-ed article, pushing a range of reforms instead.But as people have learned more about the term and some city governments have even put it into action, Americans have shown some receptiveness to it. Recent polling suggests that many Americans have come to understand the phrase as a call not to simply eliminate the keepers of the peace, but to reinvest a portion of their funding in other programs and crime prevention techniques.Running for Congress in New York, Mondaire Jones -- a progressive political newcomer who appears poised to win his still-undecided election in a suburban district -- articulated that vision last month, when he endorsed "defunding police and reinvesting this money in health, education and alternatives to incarceration."Pollsters at PerryUndem, a public opinion research firm, have been studying the public's response to the protests, and they said they had found voters -- particularly Democrats -- more curious about than dismissive of the term."It had such an initial backlash that people had to explain: 'Well, no, here's what it means,'" said Tresa Undem, a partner with the firm. "It was a small window when a lot of learning happened, and it's these windows when things change."Americans see racism as a problem, and broadly support the protests.Polls have consistently shown that an overwhelming share of Americans see racism as a big problem in the country, and that a slimmer but still-strong majority view Floyd's death as part of a systemic problem with policing in America. In a Kaiser Family Foundation poll last month, 74% of Americans said "police violence against the public" was a problem, with 42% calling it a major one.Overall, support for the protests against racial injustice continues to run high. In various recent national surveys, roughly 6 in 10 respondents have expressed favorable views of the protesters. And Americans generally express support for overhauling police practices. The Kaiser poll found that two-thirds supported banning chokeholds, while roughly three-quarters supported increasing transparency around police misconduct and making it easier for victims of excessive force to sue departments.But protesters' central demand has to do with more than reform. They are arguing for undoing and rethinking the way crime is approached in America. And their demands show little sign of going away.'Defund' calls have forced legislative movement.Councils in cities across the country have committed over the past month to reducing funding for police departments, or even restructuring them entirely. In New York, the City Council passed a budget this week that shifts $1 billion away from the Police Department. Activists criticized it for using a budgetary maneuver to shift around -- rather than eliminate -- some funding, but it does require the city to abandon plans to hire over 1,000 new officers.And the very fact that city leaders felt compelled to say they were removing funding from the department marked a huge political shift, grounded in public opinion.Jawanza James Williams, director of organizing for Vocal-NY, which has been instrumental in the push to defund the New York City Police Department, said organizers were seeking to ensure that calls to defund the police were always understood in tandem with calls to reinvest in other aspects of city government."I'm sure 'abolishing slavery' was toxic at the time, for most people in the country," Williams said. "The work is to help people understand the depth of the 'defund' framework, and to inform that with other factors."When it comes to public opinion, wording matters.People of varying racial backgrounds tend to express a positive view of their local law enforcement agencies, according to many polls. And Americans usually balk at proposals to cut basic funding from the police. In an Associated Press/NORC poll last month, when asked simply whether they supported reducing funding for police departments, just 25% of Americans said yes, 53% said no, and 21% said neither, suggesting they hadn't made their minds up yet.A Fox News poll taken around the same time asked the question a little differently: Would people support taking money away from police departments and putting it toward "mental health, housing and other social services?" In that case, 41% of voters expressed support, while 46% opposed it. Significantly, even though "neither" wasn't an option, 12% of respondents refused to say either way.With such a large share of the country still figuring out where it stands on the issue, there is the potential for either side to seize control of the narrative. President Donald Trump has demonstrated that he sees an opportunity to win some ground here, tweeting frequently of his opposition to "defund the police."In mid-June, sounding assured that he had the political upper hand, he wrote on Twitter: "Many Democrats want to Defund and Abolish Police Departments. HOW CRAZY!"Still, as protests have led to legislative results in some cities, they have also helped shift attitudes. A Siena College poll of New York late last month found that a slim majority of the city's residents would support a reduction in funding for the police. (The question did not mention anything about redirecting funding toward social services.) When asked directly about "defund the police," New Yorkers were more split: 41% supportive, 47% opposed.But when asked if mental health professionals should come along when police officers respond to calls dealing with homelessness, drug addiction or mental illness, almost 9 in 10 New York City residents said yes.In its recent research, the PerryUndem team was struck by how relatively unformed -- and therefore influenceable -- opinions remained on the meaning, as well as the validity, of calls to "defund the police."PerryUndem's survey was conducted with the online polling firm YouGov, using what is known as a nonprobability panel of respondents, whose composition may not perfectly reflect the makeup of the country. Therefore, the survey's exact numbers must be taken with a grain of salt. But its findings were striking. Americans were more likely to say that they interpreted "defund the police" to mean taking some funding away from departments and deploying it in "other ways to make communities safer," rather than simply removing money that the police need.But neither position was identified by a majority of respondents, and a significant share said they still weren't sure how to interpret the term."When you see that, you see an issue that's very fluid, and I think it can go different directions as this issue and debate continues," said Mike Perry, also a partner at the firm. "How the debate continues to take shape -- it could move people in either direction."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


    read more

  • Dozens mourn man who killed himself in busy Beirut district

    Dozens mourn man who killed himself in busy Beirut districtDozens of people lay flowers on a main Beirut street where a man killed himself on Friday, with some blaming his death on the country's economic collapse that has left more and more Lebanese hungry. Reuters could not establish the motive for the apparent suicide. The 61-year-old man shot himself in the head in front of a Dunkin' Donuts store in the capital's busy Hamra district, witnesses said.


    read more

  • Before COVID hit, China hoarded protective gear. But two can play that game | Opinion

    Before COVID hit, China hoarded protective gear. But two can play that game | OpinionCOVID-19 has a proven antiviral remedy called Remdesivir, but buying up three months’ worth of the drug’s global supplies has put the United States in the crosshairs of international criticism, making America look both heartless and hypocritical.


    read more

  • Tucker Carlson 2024? The GOP is buzzing

    Tucker Carlson 2024? The GOP is buzzingThe Fox News host's ratings have gone gangbusters, and many Republicans think he'd be a force in a Republican primary.


    read more

  • Sudan says talks on Nile dam resumed with Egypt, Ethiopia

    Sudan says talks on Nile dam resumed with Egypt, EthiopiaSudan announced Friday the resumption of talks with Egypt and Ethiopia to resolve the long-running dispute over Addis Ababa's construction of a mega-dam on the Nile River. The three countries have been at odds after multiple rounds of talks over the years failed to produce a deal on the operation and filling of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Ethiopia says the project is essential for its development, while Egypt and Sudan worry about access to vital water supplies from the Nile.


    read more

  • Protester Blamed ‘Black Man’ for Giving Her Molotov Cocktail Gear. Then Cops Found Note From a White Painter.

    Protester Blamed ‘Black Man’ for Giving Her Molotov Cocktail Gear. Then Cops Found Note From a White Painter.When 27-year-old Samantha Shader was first arrested for allegedly throwing a Molotov cocktail at police, she told detectives that the supplies—including glass bottles—were given to her by a group of Black men and women, according to federal court records.But weeks later, on Friday, police arrested a white man who admitted to providing the materials, 29-year-old Timothy Amerman. According to court records and a Facebook page that appears to belong to Amerman, he works as a painter in Saugerties, New York. Amerman faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted of civil disorder or civil disorder conspiracy, for which he was charged in a federal complaint this week.Shader allegedly threw the explosive at a police vehicle with four New York Police Department officers inside at 11 p.m. on May 29 during the nationwide unrest following the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd, prosecutors have said. The vehicle was damaged but the officers—who were reportedly uninjured—were able to jump out of the van and chase Shader down.New York Cops Beat Protesters for Crime of Being ThereProsecutors have claimed that Shader bit one of the officers’ legs when she was being taken into custody. She was arrested early the next morning in Brooklyn, and waived her Miranda rights, telling law enforcement officers that she was “approached on the street and given ‘the bottle’ by a Black male, who was in a group with one other Black male and a Black woman,” federal prosecutors allege in the federal complaint against Amerman.Shader “described the man who handed the bottle to her as a ‘thicker guy’ with hair in ‘skinny dreads’ that were different colors,” and the second man “as smaller than the first and wore a hat that concealed his hair,” the complaint claims, noting that Shader alleged the woman had “poofy” hair. “Shader stated that she felt [it was] important at the time she took the bottle because she was the only white person in the area,” the complaint claimed.Prosecutors said that Shader, who was allegedly caught on camera hurling the bottle toward the police vehicle, has been previously arrested 11 times in 11 states. She was reportedly convicted in three of those incidents. Shader’s court-appointed lawyer, Amanda David, has repeatedly declined to comment on the charges, and she did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Daily Beast on Saturday.But when officers searched the car Shader and her sister drove to New York City from her home in Catskill, police said they found a note with Amerman’s fingerprints that read: “I found a few more glass bottles Than I thought I had, Though still not many. I’m giving you my mask in hopes That helps. Wish I had more. There’s also a bag in here for you. BE SAFE Please. Really Good Luck, - Love Tim.”Shader was previously indicted on seven charges related to the incident, and her case is pending. Her sister, Darian, was charged with resisting arrest for allegedly jumping on the back of an officer who was trying to detain Shader.During the protests after Floyd’s death, the NYPD was heavily criticized for its often violent response, in one case shoving a Brooklyn woman to the ground, causing her to be hospitalized. The next day, videos showed police cruisers driving into a crowd of protesters. The Daily Beast reported that a hospital worker simply walking home from his job was beaten by police that same weekend.In an interview with authorities, Amerman admitted that he gave Shader “projectiles to throw at police and counter-protesters,” but decided against joining her to “cause some hell,” according to the complaint filed in his arrest.Amerman was set to appear in federal court in Albany on Saturday afternoon, followed by a bail hearing. He was still in custody on Saturday and did not yet have a defense attorney listed on federal court documents.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


    read more

  • Speculation grows over Biden running mate contenders

    Speculation grows over Biden running mate contenders	The vast majority of Democrats say it’s ‘important’ that Joe Biden name a woman of color as his potential running mate, according to a new national poll; reaction and analysis from the ‘Special Report’ All-Stars.


    read more